Category Archives: Washington Post

DMV: D.C.’s Schizophrenic Sports Columnist

Jason Reid now agrees with the 85% who disagree with him. [FTW]

London Fletcher on RGIII, Darrell Green and leadership. [John Keim]

I don’t agree w/ Shanny here, but what do you want him to say? [Keim]

Who wants this Redskins-themed ambulance for $38,000? [Bog]

John Wall has not been good for the Wiz so far this season. [TAI]

If the answer is Vesely, I don’t want to know the question. [Wiz Insider]

Another reminder that John Carlson is playing great hockey. [NBC]

In-depth look at how bad Bryce Harper is vs. lefties. [Nats Journal]

The Nats 2014 payroll stands at about $120 million. [Nats Insider]

Mike Wise And Redskins Reporter Rich Tandler Get Pissy On Twitter

This is about as juicy a D.C. media Twitter beef as you’ll ever have tweetside seats to. For context, what Comcast SportsNet Redskins reporter Rich Tandler is referring to is Mike Wise’s Redskins column in today’s Washington Post. I didn’t find it overly offensive, but whatever: TWITTER BEEF!

* You’ll see that we instigated a bit, but some things are too sweet to not RT.

Tandler’s Initial Shots Fired

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The Definitive Washington Post Sports Columnist Power Rankings

Kevin Reiss, who is a guy I follow on Twitter, asked something interesting the other day:

How did Mike Wise come to be the best, sorry, least worst, sports columnist at WaPo?

He then went on to rank the Washington Post Sports columnists from “least worst” to worst. It was an exercise that was relevant to my interests.

So I set out to get a larger group’s collective opinion, first asking our Mr. Irrelevant staff for their rankings and then throwing it out on Twitter and Facebook too. Some notes about that:

– We included the Post’s five full-time columnists but not contractor or syndicated columnists.

– We didn’t include the Post’s other sports reporters, because if they’re not going to label them as columnists then we aren’t either.

– The Mr. Irrelevant staff includes me, Chris Mottram, JP Finlay, Matt Terl, Jack Kogod, Rob Abbott, Todd Davis, Brad Parker and Andy Peden. We are all 20-to-40-something white males.

– We had 40-50 respondents on Twitter and Facebook. I have no idea who most of those people are, let alone how old they are or what they look like.

With that out of the way, here’s what I got back … Continue reading

Tarik El-Bashir Leaving WaPo For Comcast SportsNet [MEMO]

Washington Post sports reporter Tarik El-Bashir is headed to Comcast SportsNet to cover the Redskins, according to a WaPo memo (below).

I enjoyed El-Bashir’s work at the Post, and the paper’s Caps coverage suffered when he left that beat. Now he gets to cover the Skins for Skins bedfellow CSN, which should benefit from the move. We wish him well.

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Five Questions With D.C. Sports Bog Co-Conspirator Sarah Kogod

If you read us then you also read the D.C. Sports Bog, so it’s of interest when, after years of going stag, Agent Steinz finally adds a dance partner. She’s Sarah Kogod, who you may know, and she already scored a nice little scoop for the Post. She was kind enough to answer our questions too.

1. So what do your WaPo duties entail, aside from keeping Bog HQ stocked with craft beer and cheeses?

Actually, Dan’s on the beer and cheese. I’m responsible for puppies and chocolate chip cookies.

Basically, I’ll be doing a little of what Dan does with some personal player stuff added in. With the Bog growing as quickly as it did, it was hard to get out there and cover actual real life things. Hopefully that will change.

2. What are the primary ways this job differs from your Capital Games gig at NBC Washington?

I’ll be transcribing more radio interviews.

The biggest difference is the time commitment, but it’s actually going to be quite similar in most ways It’s also going to be nice to not have to compete with Steinberg for stories. (Ed. note: I hear that.)

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Washington Post’s Disturbingly Illustrated Start To Caps Season

As announced the other day, Brad Parker is one of our two new Capitals Correspondents. Here’s his first post; it’s a doozy.

For some reason this offseason seemed excruciatingly long.

Maybe it was being swept by Tampa Bay. Maybe it was actually feeling sorry for Sidney Crosby for eight months. Maybe it’s because the NFL tricked us into being worried about football every day this summer. Whatever, it seemed long.

Then to top it off the season starts on a Thursday but the Caps don’t drop the puck till Saturday night.

So when the Washington Post came on Thursday (Yes, I still get the paper. Printed on paper. And every couple of weeks I read some of it. Suck it trees!) I was probably more excited than I should have been to see that there was a “Four-Page Pullout Guide to the NHL Season” inside.

What did I learn from this glorious gaze into the months-long battle for hockey’s Holy Grail that gets underway this weekend? Not a fucking thing.

Why you ask? Because I was so frightened by the monstrosity on the front page that I dared not enter.

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Watch D.C. Sports Bog’s Dan Steinberg Accept A Major Award

I was at Blogs With Balls 4 this weekend moderating the “rising stars” panel, and this was one of my favorite moments from the “future of sports” event:

That’s just about the most Steinz video ever. Cheers to Dan and all of the award winners, including some folks Chris and I are lucky enough to work with at SB Nation and Yahoo! Sports, respectively. Yay, us!

Jason Reid: ‘Dan Snyder Picked Malcolm Kelly’

Washington cut Malcolm Kelly yesterday, ending an injury-riddled three-year saga that began with him being one of three receivers the Redskins selected in the second round of the 2008 draft. The intrigue doesn’t quite end there, though, as Washington Post Redskins reporter-turned-sports columnist Jason Reid unleashed a string of tweets last night:

Noticed a lot of stuff today linking Vinny Cerrato with Malcolm Kelly. Let’s be clear about this: Daniel M. Snyder picked Kelly.

He picked him despite the warnings of the team’s medical staff. Several coaches on staff at time thought it was a mistake, but as one told me after Kelly was picked: “That’s what the owner wanted to do.” Just setting the record straight. Peace.

Just to be clear II: Cerrato shares responsibility for what occurred on his watch. That’s what comes with the big title and salary to match. I would never suggest otherwise. But Snyder’s supposed lack of involvement through the years is my all-time favorite fairy tale. Makes for a good laugh, though.

It’s been speculated, and even assumed, that Snyder was involved with football decisions in the past, but this is the clearest indication yet of him doing so. It was news to me. It seemed to be news to others on Twitter as well, but Reid, Washington Post sports editor Lindsay Applebaum and even the Washington Post Sports’ staff Twitter account were adamant that Reid had published this previously on the Post.

Applebaum told me to “Google it.” @PostSports suggested I “comb through The Insider’s list of Snyder-tagged posts.” And Reid said, “I mentioned this in a dead-tree edition report as well. I think it was last year when I wrote about the 2008 class.”

I believe this is the story Reid is referring to, and this is the closest it comes to saying “Snyder picked Kelly:”

Through team spokesman Tony Wyllie, Cerrato said team sources were inaccurate in portraying Snyder as having a role in the selection of Kelly.

“He had a phenomenal workout” before the draft, Cerrato said. “We all made the decision [but] Dan was not involved. He made the trip to [Oklahoma] just to offer support.”

Cerrato may have denied it then, but he seems to be singing a different tune now. I mentioned to Reid on Twitter that this Snyder-Kelly business would make for a good column, especially if he quotes Cerrato saying he would’ve taken star Kansas City Chiefs running back Jamaal Charles instead. To which Reid responded, “Someone in [the] organization told me that’s who they wanted.”

I do hope Jason writes that column. And I really hope Snyder has learned his lesson already.

Should WaPo Stop Covering National Sports and Start Covering Baltimore?

Just the other day the honorable Smokin’ Al Koken complained about the Washington Post paying short shrift to the Stanley Cup with its lack of coverage. Considering all of the ink WaPo spilled on the NBA Finals and other national sporting events du jour, it was a fair point.

And then yesterday Dan Steinberg, in a longer post about D.C. United TV ratings being up, shared the WaPo ombudsman’s findings that readers are more interested in the Baltimore Ravens than they are in the Washington Wizards. The Orioles also ranked ahead of the Mystics and United.

Which leads us to two questions, both of which I have opinions on, but I’m curious to hear from the collective. Please place your votes and explain your reasoning in the comments if you’d be so kind.

* For the purposes of this discussion coverage is defined as original content only and doesn’t include wire services and the like, data providers, photo agencies, etc.