Maryland-B1G Roundtable: ‘I’ve Always Hated Penn St. Anyway’

The news today that Maryland will leave the ACC to join the Big Ten has the college sports world back on the brink of conference armageddon. Beyond what changes may come, many Terps fans are left confused, upset, excited, or some combination of everything.

We polled our “staff” for their reactions and provided everything below. It’s hard to say what, if any, consensus was reached, but maybe a sad reluctance to leave the ACC was matched with an understanding of the financial landscape of college sports that forced the move. Tell us what you think.

Brad Parker:

When I first heard the news on Saturday I was angry and distraught. I’ve been fiercely loyal to the ACC my entire life and it’s hard to imagine a life without at least one shot to knock off Duke every year. Basically, the move was just one more reason to dislike Kevin Anderson.

But after a couple of days of letting it sink in, and reading some very smart in-depth analysis, there are reasons to embrace the move. Obviously the finances make sense, as does being proactive in an unstable environment.

We’ve all seen the same arguments for and against, here are a few things you might not have thought about.

1. Maryland in the Rose Bowl. It might not happen in the next 5 years, but I plan on being alive for more than 5 years. I’m warning my sister now that when it does happen I’ll be crashing on her couch in LA for few days.

2. Beating Penn St. UMD and PSU used to play every year. In my lifetime there was only one time when the Terps didn’t lose. I was at that glorious 13-13 tie in Baltimore. I plan on being there when we finally win a game against them. PSU football is our new Duke basketball.

3. Road trips. I could care less about going to a game at Wake Forest, but tell me you’re not psyched to see the Terps play at the Big House, or Columbus, or Happy Valley, or Lincoln. All of those venues are on most college football bucket lists, now you’ll have a chance every couple of years to cross it off.

It will take some time to adjust, but wouldn’t you rather make the move now than be desperately scrambling to find a home after other leave the ACC?

JP Finlay:

It sucks for Maryland to leave the ACC. ACC hoops has been a part of my life as long as I can remember. I love playing Duke and Carolina, love hating the Wolf Pack and the preppy dorks at UVa.

I’m sad. But not mad. Moving to the Big Ten is the right move. UMD needs the cash, badly. And the ACC has always treated UMD like second-class citizens, even though the Terps are a founding member and home to one of the larger media markets in the country.

But the truth of the matter is the ACC could collapse, or turn into some bastardized conference similar to the Big East. The ND move was bad for the conference. ND gets to have its cake and eat it too. They keep all their football money while taking the ACC’s hoops and non-rev sports resources.

When Maryland leaves, what’s to stop Florida State and Clemson? They want more notoriety and respect in football, and it aint coming in the ACC. Once the dominoes start falling who knows what will happen. But the Big Ten has the most cash and the football clout to keep the Terps solvent and relevant.

It’s a sad day, but things evolve. I’ve always hated Penn State anyway, now it actually matters.

Jamie Mottram:

I haven’t been this broken up about realignment since the NFC East lost the Cardinals.

Two things, though: 1. As someone who came to the Terps later in life, I don’t really care about the ACC — I care about Maryland. And if Maryland athletics can prosper in the B1G in ways that it can’t in the ACC, then great, do that.

2. As someone who grew up in the DMV, I don’t really care about college football either. This move could change that for future generations, assuming the Terps rip off a 10-win season once or twice a decade. Even if they don’t, having Ohio St., Michigan, Penn St., etc. coming through College Park raises the game, especially if Maryland raises theirs.

Matt Terl:

I’m totally in favor of the move. I think my main, personal Maryland era ended when Gary left — THAT was the big switch. This is just another shift, and one that I think will yield benefits down the line. I don’t understand people totally freaking out about it, honestly.

Andy Peden:

I’m not an alum but am a lifelong fan so understand my views are based on what I think is best for basketball then football then the rest of the sports. The ACC lost something when it added VT, BC and Miami. The home-and-home in basketball was truly amazing when you got to have home games every year with Duke, UNC, NCST, GT and closed every season with UVA. Obviously that went away but MD did continue to get Duke and UVA twice plus everyone else on a regular basis. It wasn’t perfect but it was good enough. With the most recent expansion, the ACC lost all tradition. And tradition is basically the only argument to stay.

Maybe I would feel different if the ACC actually treated MD as an equal, but 1 ACC tournament in DC in the last 25+ years isn’t equal. I know that folks will say that MD will be an outsider on the B10 but at least we know that going in and it comes with a big check.

I’m not thrilled with the future matchups with Nebraska or Iowa but they aren’t any worse than BC and Miami. I am excited about a conference tourney in Chicago instead of Greensboro.

Terps Big 10 image taken with love from HamptonRoads.com.

11 thoughts on “Maryland-B1G Roundtable: ‘I’ve Always Hated Penn St. Anyway’”

  1. Does anyone think this could possibly hurt Turgeon’s recruiting? Not saying the Big 10 is garbage, just that it doesn’t seem to have the same appeal in the local recruiting bed as the ACC (see: everyone’s reaction).

    Next year’s Big 10/ACC challenge will be weird.

  2. Could definitely hurt Turgeon’s recruiting. But if the ACC collapses, which I think it will, then there really is no “premier” basketball conference in the country anymore. And if these is one, its the Big 10. With Indiana, Wisconsin, Michigan State, Ohio State and occasionally strong Michigan and Purdue. Maryland will fit in well there. The only recruiting hurt is that kids won’t be able to have their families watch them on the road trips. But maybe that just opens a new part of the country to Maryland recruiting.

    I’m in favor of the move. If the number is truly a $100 million dollar increase as Pete Thamel says is what Delany offered by 2020 then this is a no brainer.

    Tradition can’t be quantified but tradition has already been dying and now with Syracuse and Pitt’s additions will be dead. Maryland may have been a charter member but the ACC has been evolving since they added Georgia Tech and FSU. This is just a new change for Maryland.

    Hopefully the ACC now collapses and Duke has to go play in the Sun Belt.

  3. Maryland is going to get absolutely obliterated in football. If he wasn’t already, Edsall is sitting in his office with a cyanide capsule in his hand.

  4. Edsall is happy if anything. He gets to recruit kids and say they are going to play in the Big 10. That’s a huge leg up instead of saying ACC.

  5. I think this is a great day for Maryland – the state, the university and the athletic programs. I am no doubt saddened by the departure from tradition – and I will especially miss playing UVA, UNC, NCST and Duke (in that order, for me). If we could be making B1G money playing those teams, then sure, stick with the status quo. But that’s clearly not happening.

    People who are claiming that we’re going to look like idiots playing Iowa and Minnesota clearly haven’t noticed that we’re playing BC in front of high school-sized crowds and were to be soon playing Pitt and Syracuse regularly.

    This is the right move academically. It’s the right move financially. And it’s the right decision for the future of the entire institution.

    So many people won’t “miss” the ACC. They will “miss” the identity that came with playing little brother to UNC and Duke and sticking it to those snooty bastards. As Feinstein said today, Maryland didn’t have true rivals in the ACC, it had teams it enjoyed beating (a lot). And for a time, that was awesome (see the late 90s and early 00s glory days). My point is that if your identity is defined by your massive inferiority complex to two other institutions, you desperately need a new identity. And, if that new identity comes with a massive infusion of resources, elevated academic prestige and experiencing what it’s like to be wanted (when was the last time the ACC made Maryland feel valuable, by the way?), then bring it on.

    As we saw this year with Texas A&M’s almost immediate rejuvenation/reinvention in the SEC (and more importantly, out of the shadow of the Texas Longhorns), sometimes, it takes getting away from something that you feel defined you to discover your true self and your true potential. Like A&M, getting out of the shadow(s) of (a) team(s) that defined your athletic achievement is sometimes the best thing that can happen to you. I don’t think A&M misses that feeling one bit. And I think in the long road, the same will happen to Maryland. I’m hopeful that someday, we’ll look back on the day we broke our obsession with Duke and Tobacco Road and the ultimately failed marriage with the ACC as the day that reinvented Maryland athletics.

    Bring on the Big Ten.

  6. This will not effect Basketball recruiting at all. You lose Duke and UNC which you are only guaranteed to play once a year and replace them with Indiana, MSU, OSU. Those schools have a pretty good history. Plus we get to develop a real rival in PSU.

  7. PSU is a unimpressive rival since the sports don’t match up. Their football team will continue to be superior while the Terp hoops should always be better.

    I’m all for the move, but am having a very hard time finding anything to be excited about in all this.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>