Have You Ever Looked At Jay Schroeder’s Pro Football Reference Page?

Screen Shot 2016-01-04 at 10.23.56 PMKirk Cousins’ amazing 2015 regular season, capped off by a fantastic Week 17 performance, brought something obvious into focus: Washington hasn’t enjoyed excellent quarterbacking during the modern, pass-heavy era.

Cousins broke a franchise record with 4,166 passing yards, you see. That’s only good for 10th in the NFL this season, but it’s more than any Washington passer ever, breaking Jay Schroeder’s 29-year-old mark of 4,109 in 1986.

I hadn’t thought about Schroeder in some time, but when I did think of him a few things came to mind:

*He had really blond hair and a very strong arm.
*He spent a good long time in the Blue Jays farm system.
*He bridged the gap between Theismann and Williams-Rypien.
*He was a decent quarterback, but not quite good enough.
*He was traded to Oakland for Jim Lachey, who was awesome.

While that’s all true and interesting enough, I didn’t realize just how fascinating Schroeder’s career was. Behold its curious magnificence, via his Pro Football Reference page:

1. Washington went 24-7 in games started by Schroeder, and 2-1 in playoff games. QB wins are bullshit, but that’s incredible, and it’s a credit to those Joe Gibbs-led Skins teams (and certainly to Gibbs himself).

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2. Schroeder threw 22 picks the year he set the record. That sounds like a ton, and it is, but it was also in line with his body of work and very much a sign of the time. Those 22 INTs tied Hall of Famers Phil Simms and Dan Fouts that year for fourth, and HOFers Warren Moon and Dan Marino threw 26 and 23, respectively.

3. His completion percentage that season was only 51.0%. And that’s actually slightly above his career average of 50.8%.

4. Schroeder was No. 1 in ’86 in yards per completion with 14.9. He actual led the NFL in this stat three times, and his career high was 17.0 with Oakland in ’89. (As a point of comparison, Cousins only averaged 11.0 this year, though he did complete 69.8% of his passes, so their yards per attempt were similar.)

5. His QB rating across three seasons with the Skins was only 73.0. That’s not great, even then. He did post a 90.8 with the Raiders in ’90, though.

6. He posted winning records with the Raiders and Cardinals, too. Schroeder went 32-25 across five seasons with Los Angeles and 5-3 in his one season with Arizona. He even led the Raiders to an AFC Championship game, meaning he was one win away from the Super Bowl with two different teams, going 12-4 both seasons. Not bad for a pretty mediocre, somewhat forgettable QB. (Or was he?)

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3 thoughts on “Have You Ever Looked At Jay Schroeder’s Pro Football Reference Page?”

  1. I think the knock on Schroeder was that nobody liked him. IHe started one college game ever too I think, so how he even got there and played at a fairly high level is kind of amazing.

    He also had a pretty good punting performance against the Bears in ’85. I was going to do a whole long-ish post about that on the anniversary (more for…the other backup punter), but the youtube video of that game had audio problems, so I skipped it. Also, who blogs anymore?

  2. He was my favorite Quarterback growing up. I became a football fan in 1988. I am a huge Raiders fan. I know Schoeder was basically a very average Quarterback but he was my favorite. Looking at the history, I think he received a very raw deal in Washington.

  3. Schroeder was one of the most talented QBs in the league. He could laser it 70 yards, ran a 4.6 forty, was 6′ 4″, could punt 50 yards, and also played professional baseball. He led two teams to the NFC and AFC championship within 5 years, and basically led a Super Bowl team in between. The 87 skins were Jay’s team. Doug Wiliams had 1 good quarter. The rest of that yr was Jay’s year. He threw for 4000 yards in 86 which is like throwing for 5000 today. His 22 interceptions in 86 included 6 in one game where it didn’t matter – hail Mary’s intercepts included. If the skins worked it out with him instead of trading him, 1988, 89, and 90 might have been Super Bowl yrs as well. Instead we had to watch Williams flake out and rypien develop. Jay won, and ended up starting,
    wherever he went. We should have kept him and stayed strong to the mid 90’s.

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